The noble art of horticulture

Discussion in 'Science & Technology' started by Moscow, Oct 25, 2013.

Encyclopedia Dramatica Forums
A very friendly community
  1. Moscow

    Moscow
    Expand Collapse
    It's not just about football

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    3,910
    Occupation:
    Judging you
    Home Page:
    So, EDF, this seems like as good a place as any to plonk this thread. are there any of you out there who enjoy growing things? anything, whether it's weed or bonsai trees it doesn't matter, post your plants here.
    plus if you have any tips for or want to ask for advice on the culture of something then this is also the thread to do it in.

    anyway, without further ado, allow me to kick off. I'm into carnivorous plants. in a big way. I have a fairly sizable collection and a good portion of the free space in my room is taken up with them and the supplies that go with them. So, I decided that I would share with you some pics of my favorite plants from my collection. beware this is a TL;DR post but it has lots of pictures coming up so it's not really very taxing at all tbh.

    lets begin with Cephalotus follicularis, aka the albany pitcher plant. It's endemic to australia and is found in the far southwest of the country, often on the coastline. it's a sometimes challenging plant to grow due to it's tendency to die off for no reason other than spite. mine has just produced it's first adult pitcher.
    [​IMG]
    a close up on the developing adult pitcher, note the difference in morphology between the other juvenile pitchers.
    [​IMG]

    next up I have a couple of Pinguicula or Butterworts as they are commonly known. Ping's have a fairly shallow and sometimes delicate root system so repotting them is challenging at times, a good many species hail from mexico including these...
    [​IMG]
    this is Pinguicula cyclosecta, it's a really easy to grow species that has gorgeous blue leaf margins. it's pretty tough and can stand a fair bit of abuse.

    and below is P. x weser a hybrid between P. moranensis and P. elhersiae. this one develops pink tinged leaves when given enough light
    [​IMG]
    I also did some macro shots of the leaves to try and show the tiny beads of mucilage, note the small fly in one pic that has fallen prey to the rose tinted leaves
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Right, on to the sundews now... one of the most populous carnivorous genera with members of every continent except antarctica many are easy to grow but some are really fucking tricky.
    first up I have a pair of very closely related species from queensland australia, Drosera. adelae and D. prolifera. they are members of a group of 3 species that hail from queensland and are much easier to grow than their relative D. schizandra which is a picky little bitch. all 3 species enjoy warmth and humidity but D. adelae will grow fine out on a shelf or windowsill with enough light and D. prolifera just needs to be kept warm and slightly more humid than normal.

    D. adelae...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    and D. prolifera
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    now for something a bit interesting, Drosera regia, the king sundew. a critically endangered species from south africa, it is an enormous and archaic species reaching leaf lengths of almost 30". it's closest genetic relative is in fact the Venus Fly Trap, Dionaea muscipula.

    bit of a wide angle shot here, couldn't get it all in up close, you can see a number of my sarracenia and some other drosera in the background.
    [​IMG]
    close up on the leaf
    [​IMG]
    growing point shot
    [​IMG]

    next I have the ubiquitous Venus Fly Trap, Dionaea muscipula. native to the carolinas in the USA there are many different cultivars available with some looking VERY different from others. pretty much everyone seems to have had one and killed it as a child, in reality their culture is not hard, and as long as you give it it's dormancy period and, like all carnivorous plants use only rain or distilled/RO/purified water then it'll be happy as larry.

    I have a few different cultivars, here are 3 to demonstrate how different things can be
    first up "cup trap" so called because of it's odd traps fused at the far end to make a cup.
    [​IMG]
    next we have "big mouth"
    [​IMG]
    a trap
    [​IMG]
    trigger hair close up
    [​IMG]
    lastly we have "f12" don't ask about the name, I have no idea.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    ok, time for another yankee plant, Sarracenia purpurea, one of the most widespread species, with a range that included much of the east coast of the US, the great lakes and even into the southeastern reaches of canada, not to to mention naturalised populations in peat bogs in ireland (how about it, an american going to ireland for a change instead of the paddy heading out there) this one is another easy plant, it stays fairly small with pitchers at about 30cm long at maximum size (given some sarracenia pitchers stand nearly as tall as me that is definitely small) again, requires winter dormancy but it's fully hardy so it'll stand most winters even in the colder spots of the US.
    [​IMG]

    and a detail shot of a pitcher
    [​IMG]

    Right, now we reach that last series of shots that I took, these are my Nepenthes species and hybrids. tropical pitcher plants that have their main stronghold in southeast asia, you know, indonesia, cambodia, that sort of place. there are also a few species found in oz though I don't grow any of them.they all require humidity and good light, as far as temperature goes, some enjoy it around 30-35C and others like a nighttime temperature of down to 5C

    first up is a malyasian species, N. sanguinea, I have a couple of these from different sources and they do, apart from the similarity in pitcher morphology, behave like different species.
    here is clone 1, which had redder, less robust leaves and grows quite slowly
    [​IMG]
    and a shot of one of the pitchers
    [​IMG]

    and clone 2, which has greener, thicker leaves and a much more robust look about it. it also grows like billy oh.
    [​IMG]
    now a close up on that big pitcher
    [​IMG]
    and lastly, a shot of a pitcher that is just starting to develop
    [​IMG]

    our magical mystery tour isn't over yet, Next up I have N. ventricosa native to the phillipines, this is a really easy species that can grow on practically anyones windowsill.
    [​IMG]
    close ups on a newer pitcher
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    and an older pitcher, the pinkish hue is due to the fact the inside of the pitcher has turned deep red
    [​IMG]

    this next one is a hybrid called N. x Ventrata, it's commonly found in garden centres looking very sad and neglected. it's a REALLY easy to grow plant and gets big quick too. it's about as bombproof as nep's get so makes a great babby's first nepenthes

    [​IMG]
    pitcher and peristome(pitcher lip)detail
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    and a shot of a pitcher that is still developing
    [​IMG]
    Almost done now, stay with me, next up is another hybrid, this one is N. spectabilis x ventricosa
    and is one of my absolute favorites
    [​IMG]

    New basal growth, essentially a whole new plant developing off the same root system.
    [​IMG]

    time for some pitcher shots, this is the larger of the tow and is probably more of an intermediate pitcher, not the gorgeous striping of the peristome
    [​IMG]
    peristome close up
    [​IMG]

    and the other pitcher, this one is probably closer to a true upper pitcher
    [​IMG]
    and a close up showing the mottling of the pitcher body
    [​IMG]

    OK, well done you for reading this far, this is my last one that I'll be showing you. Nepenthes robcantleyi. it's a rare but easy to grow species that has only recently been named and described mine is only small at the moment though when it starts producing larger pitchers it is a sight to behold.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    and a shot of the biggest pitcher on it
    [​IMG]
    and the developing one
    [​IMG]
    and what they will hopefully look like in a few years time
    [​IMG]


    THATS IT! we're done. I hope you enjoyed my little tour of the more interesting points of my collection, now any questions?
     
  2. uberfukken

    uberfukken
    Expand Collapse
    Rainmaker

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2011
    Messages:
    24,906
    Since they're indoor, do you have to feed them bugs? If so what kind?
     
  3. Moscow

    Moscow
    Expand Collapse
    It's not just about football

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    3,910
    Occupation:
    Judging you
    Home Page:
    in summer I get a fuck ton of moths and insects attracted by the grow lights so they feed themselves, at other times I have a pot of dried bloodworms that I use sparingly. you don't need a lot.
     
  4. Maysam

    Maysam
    Expand Collapse
    Pilot

    Joined:
    Oct 20, 2012
    Messages:
    2,737
    Occupation:
    (_)_)::::::::::::::D~~~
    I actually don't like plants at all, but what you're growing there and how successful you are with it is quite impressive.
    I only have a spider in my room that I feed from time to time :D
     
  5. Moscow

    Moscow
    Expand Collapse
    It's not just about football

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    3,910
    Occupation:
    Judging you
    Home Page:
    my ventricosa has to date eaten 5 spiders with that one pitcher I showed. I like them, they keep the fly population down in summer, are rewarding to grow and look amazing.